Colour Correcting and Contouring For Beginners

Makeup has played a huge part in my life since I was a young girl. I’ve always been around it thanks to my equally as obsessed Mum and we spend a great deal of time looking at, talking about and buying products that we think we can’t live without. From a young age, I’ve known the key elements when it comes to enhancing my features, right down to the age old method of contouring and colour correcting. Although contouring has been made popular by Kim Kardashian, it’s actually been around for decades, with Kevyn Aucoin championing for a structured face back in the 90’s. Colour correcting was also very popular in the 80s and 90s and I remember Mum having a variety of coloured bases. I also remember having a liberal amount of a Boots No7 green base applied to my face to make my skin look green for a Halloween party when I was a child. Funny how things stick in your mind. As these methods are so popular, I thought I’d talk about the basics when it comes to changing your face shape and colour.

To use colour to correct, a basic grasp of the colour wheel has it’s advantages. I’ve always said that makeup is an art, and to an extent, it is, especially when you are using the same principles when it comes to colour. Think back to your art lesson in school where you were shown that colours opposite each other on the wheel, cancel each other out. So, green for example is opposite red, so green will cancel red out. If you had a red blemish, you would use green to make it disappear. Simples. The Sleek Colour Corrector Palette is one of the best comprehensive palettes that I’ve found, containing six shades of colour and with an amazing price of £7.99. Like you would expect from Sleek, a highly pigmented colour range, that are soft and creamy whilst being very easy to blend. I prefer to use my fingers when applying a colour corrector so I can pat the cream into the skin. Applying the colours before foundation is the ideal way to ensure an even and flawless base, and it also minimises the need for heavy foundation and concealing.

• Green: Neutralises redness – ideal for concealing scars and blemishes.
• Lilac: Neutralises yellow – ideal for brightening sallow, dull complexions.
• Blue: Neutralises orange – ideal for neutralising freckles and hyper-pigmentation.
• Rose: Adds radiance and brightens dark spots.
• Yellow: Neutralises purple – ideal for concealing veins and dark circles
• Orange: Neutralises blue – ideal for concealing dark circles on medium skin tones.

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

I have a love/hate relationship with contouring. I don’t really enjoy this heavily contoured look that seems to be very popular lately, and if it’s done badly, then girls look like they have brown strips down their faces. It’s perfect for editorial looks when on camera, but in real life a softer contour is more favourable. When I structure my face, I go for a grey toned shade to hit the hollows of my face, and keep things generally quite soft. For this I prefer a powder based contour product and knowing the contours of my face helps a great deal. I do have several cream contour palettes, but I always seem to head for the brightening shades rather than the contour shades. I’ve been playing around with the Iconic London Cream Contour palette recently, and after spending time using it, I have found that it’s actually really easy to create a softer contoured look. Using a synthetic brush is best for a cream product and I like to place a very small amount in the hollows of my cheeks, under my hairline and around my jaw and blend, blend, blend with the Iconic London Evo Face Brush to make sure that there are no sharp lines. Blending is definitely key, as is using a very small amount of product to create a shadow. Using the lighter shades to highlight and brighten the cheekbones, under eyes and cupid’s bow, you can define your face with ease. For a more defined look, you could bake your face with a setting powder for ultimate brightening.

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Colour Correcting and Contouring Sleek Iconic London Rodial

Although I incorporate contouring into my daily routine by quickly defining cheekbones, I do love a powder product to sweep across my face. I’ve fallen for the Rodial Instaglam powders, and I use the Deluxe Contouring Powder on a regular basis. In shade 4, it looks quite scary in the pan but it actually a really flattering shade to create shadows. When using the cream contour palette, it gives extra definition and a matte finish to my look, making it suitable for a big night out. To help with colour correcting, brightening and setting any light shades of contour, I have been using the Instaglam Deluxe Banana Powder. This compact is a handbag essential and compared to my Ben Nye Banana Powder, it’s so much easier to use as it’s pressed powder. Mattifying and subtle, it won’t leave skin looking yellow, but will eradicate pink tones so the skin looks flawless. I prefer to use Banana under my eyes rather than any other pressed powder as I feel that it gives an instant wide awake look.

It is quite daunting when wondering how you will manage to create a super sculpted look, but I stand by a softer finish. Once you have got used to the contours of your face and where the light hits, and doesn’t hit, it does make things a lot easier when applying product. If you still feel that it’s a huge step, then start with colour correcting to make a flawless canvas and sweep a matte brown under the cheekbones to give the illusion of a higher cheekbone.

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